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The MIM Museum in Beirut, Lebanon
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Peter




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PostPosted: Oct 14, 2013 06:05    Post subject: The MIM Museum in Beirut, Lebanon  

The new MIM Mineral Museum in Beirut, Lebanon had its grand opening this past Saturday on October 12th, 2013 which is a milestone in mineral collection history.

On 1300m2 some 1480 top mineral specimens, many of them unique and the finest known are displayed in a gorgeously designed museum where nothing has been left without much thought and fine tuning.

We were a small team of friends arriving on Friday from different locations in Europe and USA during the Friday, some of US getting a well needed preview of the Museum and a personal tour by its creator Salim Eddé.

After having experienced this museum among a few invited mineral collectors and dealers the first comment is that this is something every serious collector simply must visit.

It is not only the finest private mineral collection in the world on public display but the depth and quality of even the rarest of species is not second to the grand museums of the World which has taken centuries to create by several of the worlds best collectors. It immediately stands among the best ones and some will argue the best one, the Louvre of mineral museums.

The museum has 9 different sections which I shall later describe, all of them important.

Beirut and Lebanon is a beautiful place to visit and I would suggest to plan 3-4 days with daily visits to the museum. The exhibits and the interactive displays are worth your time and need to be reviewed the days after your first shocking experience.

The collection is the result of 17 years of very active and wise collecting by Salim Eddé, a chemist and scientist who appreciates the whole scale of minerals from the rarest ones which may not always be so esthetically pleasing unless you have an understanding for the species such as perhaps the finest native lead known from Langban, Sweden to the obviously more esthetically pleasing spray of blue aquamarine crystals on white feldspar from the mines in the vertical cliff by Bensapi bridge, Shigar Valley, Pakistan.

With just a stop over during a flight I will update this with some more information when I reach my destination. Stay tuned. Meanwhile you may see some images or film at the following sites.

Yours Sincerely,
Peter Lyckberg

Many thanks to Salim Eddé for the invitation, the grand opening which in itself was worth the trip and to the museum staff and all involved for their work.


https://www.facebook.com/mim.museum
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEjQyFW8H6w
http://www.timeoutbeirut.com/thingstodo/listing/3398/mim-museum.html
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PostPosted: Oct 14, 2013 15:41    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

The MIM Museum was featured in Lebanese television during the best evening time with an almost 2 hour long TV program on October 8th. The film which I have not yet seen entirely is:





The language is Lebanese (Arabic) but film sequences will give a bit of the impression of the museum.
I would however suggest anyone who likes surprises to simply fly to Beirut when it fits and let yourself be surprised by the fine people, country and the great Museum. The National Museum is located just 200 m down the Damascus road from the MIM and is well worth a visit.
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PostPosted: Oct 14, 2013 18:26    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

The MIM Museum
A short introduction:

The Museum is situated at the Saint-Joseph's University entrance on Damascus road in central Beirut opposite the Lebanese National Security Headquarters, which hopefully will keep its treasures safe.
Visitors are met with a gift shop and to its left a small coffee shop. In between them there is a glass sculpture of three octahedrons twinned according to the Spinel law twin (twinning on octahedral faces) inspired by a beautiful Chumar Bakhoor Mountain pink fluorite specimen in the MIM Collection.
Entering the shop one is met with a beautiful staircase of dark labradorite with its characteristic blue flashes or should one so decide there is also a “mine” elevator down into the underground.
Below the stairway one finds oneself in a large open space, the public part which may be rented for special occasions with seating, large screen displays for images and film. On the left are pillars with a first temptation of specimens for what is about to come inside the museum. Beyond these pillars is a wall made of a brushed golden three dimensional looking Penrose pattern illustrating an aperiodic/irregular quasicrystal structure made up two different tilings.
A dark opening is the entrance to the museum itself into what one could describe as the Aladins Cave of the Middle East. All walls, roof and backs, bottoms, roofs of display cases throughout the museum are black and somehow the lighting still manages to show also many black or dark minerals very well which is not an easy task to achieve.
The first wall to the left shows 9 wall mounted display cases, each with a single mineral specimen representing the 9 mineral classes from native elements to organics.

To the right is a wall mounted interactive screen with Mendeleevs Periodic System of the Elements. Here the visitor can choose for instance the element Beryllium (Be) and the element's properties are shown, to the left one can choose minerals in order to see those that contain Be in their formula and are represented in the museum. If for instance one selects the mineral Beryl, the elements making up beryl are highlighted on the screen. One can choose the finest aquamarine cluster on feldspar and manipulate it in three dimensions i.e. take a look of what it looks from behind, from above, from any angle.
There is also a function with a temperature bar where by increasing the temperature one will see at what temperature each elements change its state from solid, to liquid to gas. There may have been more options such as showing each elements size in diameter where the periodicity is clear with Cs as the largest one. My own curiosity drew me further into the museum and a loooong breakfast with friends on Sunday morning decimated my plan to return to further study the interactive displays contents. and functionality.
The non linear layout of the museum is such that any monotony is avoided.
Before entering the first huge mineral hall there is on the right side is a special exhibit with radioactive Uranium (U) and Thorium (Th) containing minerals as well as information of these elements isotopes and ability to fission and use for almost unlimited energy production in the nuclear industry.

Suddenly one enters the main hall with the HUGE systematic display where each class of minerals is represented by a number of species. All specimens displayed have been very well selected to show the best and variety of some 600 species from over 60 countries.
In every section of each display case there are so many lovely world class specimens that one would think someone had brought the best of the best from many of the old classic European museums such as Freiberg, Wien, London, Paris, Stockholm, Prague, Budapest… all to one museum!

Jumping to the case with precious metals, we come to the second case where a circa 18 cm tall specimen of HUGE German bismuth crystals is right next to a 10 cm native lead with beautiful crystals of hoppered and centrimetric size.
The collection contains so many fine and rare minerals, that one really needs to make at least two complete systematic scans after which one has without doubt still missed some goodies! The collection is additionally strong in that many species are exhibited by more than one specimen and sometimes much of an display case.

After my second few hour visit I honestly told my lunch friends that now there will not be much in comparison to see at the Munich show! Meaning that for sure the Gold exhibits will be incredible with Harvard, LA County and numerous museums and private collections displaying, but the dealers best specimens for sale will for sure be less impressive after this.

We all had high expectations and I can say that all our expectations were more then met. Now it must also be said that the small group of people who were invited from the mineral world all know many of the very best of specimens for the reason that they are so rare that to find an unknown killer is almost impossible. With this collection there are many many killer rare specimens and even I believe something even of the top ones which is unknown to most which I will mention later.

Along the right side of the systematic collection is the trophy display case exhibiting a well known huge legrandite which is even much better in reality than any image can ever convey, the best large triple octahedral fluorite on muscovite, a great spangolite, and many many others. The fact is that a great many specimens in the systematic cases could just as well have been shown here!

At the end of the systematic collection, a display of some of each country’s best minerals is found. The average level is not quite as superior here but look carefully and you will be surprised! Here there is also a huge table interactive display where one can rotate a globe, select a mine, and it will zoom in down to the mine entrance/open pit.

A double sided wall exhibits a stunning array of color and pattern full of Anjabonoina, Madagascar liddicoatite slices that are lit from behind. One huge externally red tourmaline

Behind this tourmaline wall is the hidden entrance to the innermost chamber of the museum, the Trophy Room with many specimens which would be the first to save in “case of a fire” i.e specimens which are truly unique and beautiful to perfection.
The first one is met with is an approximately 13 cm tall group of incredible native gold wires from Venezuela.

Enough for tonight!
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PostPosted: Oct 14, 2013 22:00    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

Dear Peter,

I am enjoying your report and look forward to seeing more.

Warm regards,

Don

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PostPosted: Oct 15, 2013 01:19    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

Don Lum wrote:
....look forward to seeing more....

We are looking for fine images of the Specimens & Museum, as soon as we get them we will publish them.
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PostPosted: Oct 15, 2013 05:22    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

Hi Peter: Wonderful report as far as it goes, but do we know anything much about how this collector put this amazing collection together, apparently in secret?
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PostPosted: Oct 15, 2013 06:46    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

John S. White wrote:
...Wonderful report as far as it goes, but do we know anything much about how this collector put this amazing collection together, apparently in secret?

The answer of Mr. Salim Eddé. I'm publishing it in his behalf

THE MOTIVATION BEHIND THE COLLECTION


My training as a chemical engineer has led me to be curious about what makes up the matter that surrounds us. This matter is invariably composed of 118 basic elements that we call atoms. Then, these 118 atoms combine with each other to form molecules more or less complex. These molecules then organize themselves into incredibly regular piles that we call crystals. Finally, these crystals --large and small, aggregated or simple-- make up most of the natural, inorganic solid material (that is mountains, rocks, stones and metals).

Take for example a tiny grain of table salt with an edge of about one millimeter in length: it is a cube consisting of a perfect alignment of 1,770,000 sodium atoms separated by as many atoms of chlorine in identical fashion in all three directions. That makes a total of 44 quintillion atoms in perfect alignment! With a little imagination, the edge of this cube is the equivalent of 3.5 million soldiers marching in perfect rank and file, each 100 meters distance from the other, in a straight line stretching from the Earth to the moon. Not a single head rises above those of his comrades. And this same pattern repeats itself on the other two edges.

These crystals are usually small (such as for salt or sand, whose grains can only be seen with a magnifying glass), and are assembled into rock (think of the حجر رملي of the cities of the Lebanese coast). The same can be said for metals and all that makes up ordinary solid matter. What we call minerals are these solid forms found in nature and that have a determined chemical composition; the limestone of Lebanon, for example, is a conglomerate of tiny crystals of calcium carbonate called calcite.

In some cases, however, the crystals become quite large with perfect geometrical forms and astonishing colors visible to the naked eye, shedding a dramatic light on the microscopic geometry of the stacks of atoms from which they are made.
I have always been struck by the mystery of how such order could come from the chaos that surrounds us, by the amazing variety of geometric forms that is born of these crystals, by the perfection of the plane surface and the angles between them. I have never had a talent for sculpture or drawing, and so I found myself all the more intrigued by these wonders of creation that have formed without human intervention but, rather, under the sole influence of temperature, pressure and the incredibly complex work of water and especially time. I wanted to share this wonderment for the esthetics of the mineral world on which life has built itself on this planet. Anyone who has not yet been exposed to this world naturally asks: “Who sculpted these marvelous shapes and polished the incredible flat surfaces; who composed this arrangement of different specimens; where do these colors come from?” They are convinced that such things could only be formed by the hands of an artist; they simply cannot believe that natural forces created them.
But through this exhibit of the esthetic and geometric properties of crystals, I also wanted to take visitors on a journey through the different scientific, economic, historical and geographical landscapes that are so intertwined with these minerals :


• The crystals exhibited are often the most beautiful ore specimens of the utmost industrial importance because they provide us with iron, copper and all the other metals used in modern economies.

• Some are also gem stones, whether precious or fine, that usually end up as jewelry.

• Some others are the source of extremely rare elements having important physical and chemical properties. Still others are made from crystalline edifices whose properties, once understood by scientists, indicated how they could be synthesized to revolutionize electronics and the science of modern materials.

• Further, these minerals are closely intertwined with the development of ancient civilizations, as attested to by the trade routes between Phoenicia and the British Isles for tin, an essential element in the fabrication of bronze (ancient bronze was an alloy of tin and copper, or more rarely an arsenic and copper alloy.) Copper and tin ore are rarely found in the same place, and so the bronze civilization developed thanks to international commerce. We find evidence of this commerce between Burma and Mesopotamia (for rubies, 21 centuries ago) and again between Afghanistan and Egypt –a distance of more than 4,000 kilometers—for lapis-lazuli (55 centuries ago)! And other examples abound.

• In our time, numerous adventurers have risked their lives in their quest for small stones (the Garimpeiros of Brazil, emeralds (the Guaqueros of Colombia), gold (the gold rushes of California and Amazonia) and diamonds in South Africa. Many started out in order to escape misery and poverty, while others succumbed to a stone fever as dangerous as gold fever.


If the tiny crystals invisible to the naked eye can be found in great abundance (as they make up the most of the solid matter that surrounds us), crystals large enough to be exhibited in a collection are very rare. As they are often extracted in mines, with the use of explosives, only to be transformed into metals, chemical products or gemstones, most crystals do not survive this destruction. Unlike the biosphere, where species in danger of extinction can be brought back thanks to environmental protection, our mineral heritage is destroyed forever and cannot be reconstructed. Still another goal of this collection is to conserve mineral samples in the same way that works of art are conserved in museums.
Thus, this collection was born in 1997 when I began to buy minerals, both from contemporary mines and from old collections, in different countries. I was greatly helped by several traders, as well as by the enlightened advice of Jean-Claude Bouillard, curator of the mineral collection of the Sorbonne (Université Pierre et Marie Curie) in Paris, one of the most prestigious. These purchases sometimes resulted in veritable “battles” between collectors eager to swipe up the most beautiful specimens. And sometimes luck smiled upon me in the form of inside information on new discoveries or specimens with which prestigious collections were willing to part.
Traditionally, the collector has two main options: either he specializes in a few well-known minerals with a strong visual impact (such as calcite, quartz, fluorite, rhodochrosite, tourmaline, beryl), or else he tries to collect all the mineralogical species (called a “systematic” collection). My choice was for the latter because, in my view, it allows for a much truer representation of the incredible richness of the mineral world. To be more precise, of some 4,500 mineral species established ,only 250 to 300 on Earth yield specimens that merit being exhibited (the others present microscopic crystals or rocky samples devoid of any visual interest). These are the specimens that I have collected. But as easy as it is to find quality specimens for classic species (tourmaline, calcite, quartz, etc.), it is all the more difficult to find such quality for the much rarer and less known species such as spangolite, geocronite, parahopeite, etc. And that, for me, was the challenge: how to harvest as many beautiful samples of this latter group as possible, so that they might appear in the exhibit alongside the so-named “beautiful” specimens? It was patience and tenacity that, as early as 1997, led me to hunt for certain pieces from prestigious collections (Sams, Romero, Wilber, Asselborn, Freilich, Smale, Weill, Horner), sometimes as far as the best-known museums (the museums of Houston and Tucson, the British Museum), and finally to buy them and add them as trophies to the MIM collection.
While I inherited my passion for collecting from my father --who collected oriental rugs, old coins, etc.-- it is probably from my grandmother that I got the idea for the museum. As the collection grew, I couldn’t stop thinking of what she often said of people accumulating material things:
“يا تيتا ما بعمرو حداً أخد شي معو ", that is to say: “My grandson, no one has ever taken anything with him (into the afterlife).” Guided by her words, and in particular by a desire to share my passion with the greatest number of people, in 2003 I began to consider creating a museum of mineralogy :


  • that would be non-profit

  • that would reach the greatest number of people

  • that would highlight the following aspects:

    • esthetic and artistic

    • scientific and mathematic

    • historical

    • industrial and economic

    • academic

  • adapted to the Arab world (and therefore trilingual: Arabic-French-English)

  • with the goal of promoting the science, culture, language and image of Lebanon.

It was with this in mind that I thought that a university would be the ideal place to exhibit this collection in a permanent way. And I decided to follow the example of the collection of the Sorbonne (currently at the University Pierre et Marie Curie, Jussieu campus in Paris), which has always been my model and my main source of inspiration. When in 2004 I spoke of this ambitious project with Father René Chamussy, rector of the University Saint-Joseph in Beirut, he immediately came on board and reserved for the collection a 1300 m² space in the basement of a building then under construction on the Campus for Innovation, the Economy and Sports near the National Museum of Beirut.
I then asked myself what name I should give the museum. Rather than a French or English name, I was looking for an Arabic name since the museum is in Lebanon. I also wanted an original name, and I wanted to void the usual names like the Museum of Mineralogy of Beirut. I contacted a publicity agency in Beirut and they proposed MIM, the 24th letter of the Arabic alphabet. The Arabic MIM is also the equivalent of the letter M of the Latin alphabet, and in Arabic it is the first letter of the words for “museum”, “minerals” and “mines” (and it also works in English and in French). In addition, MIM is easy to pronounce in all languages. I immediately adopted the idea.
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PostPosted: Oct 15, 2013 10:38    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

Thank you for the information, Jordi.

Don

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PostPosted: Oct 15, 2013 10:45    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

Don Lum wrote:
Thank you for the information, Jordi.

Don

Not me, but Mr. Salim. I've just copied his text! ;-)
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PostPosted: Oct 16, 2013 12:13    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

Publishing images in Peter's behalf. Both images and text are from him.


Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013.jpg
 Description:
_Wendell E Wilson and Tom Gressman from the Mineralogical Record were invited as expert mineral connoseurs and of course for the beautiful journal The Mineralogical Record which has been the Tzar of Mineralogical Journals for many decades. Here having breakfast at the just opened modern 5 star hotel The Smallville Hotel with very friendly staff, located only 500 m down the Damascus Road from the MIM Museum. I would HIGHLY recommend to stay here for a visit.

Photo & text: Peter
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Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013.jpg



Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013 (1).JPG
 Description:
_Breakfast at The Smallville Hotel From left to right: Top collector and now also dealer Gilles Emringer, Paris, material scientist/ mineralogist/gemmologist Elois Gaillou from LA County Museum, french dealer Brice Gobin (Mr Carrolite jackpot!), french geologist/dealer/Madagascar expert Laurent Thomas.

Photo & text: Peter
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Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013 (1).JPG



Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013 (2).JPG
 Description:
_MIM Museum

Photo & text: Peter
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Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013 (2).JPG



Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013 (3).JPG
 Description:
_Salim Eddé is starting his private showing for the invitees on Saturday morning with the University Building in the background. Entrance to the MIM is behind the photographer.

Photo & text: Peter
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Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013 (3).JPG



Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013 (4).JPG
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_Underground in public area

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Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut Libanon October 12th 2013 (4).JPG


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PostPosted: Oct 17, 2013 02:03    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

Superb reportage from Eloïse Gaillou from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles here:
http://nhminsci.blogspot.com.es/2013/10/opening-of-mim-museum-in-beirut-lebanon.html

Extremely well done and with a lot of images!
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PostPosted: Oct 17, 2013 05:03    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

Superb indeed! What an extraordinary effort. Almost as good as having been there. And the collection is unbelievable. How this amazing collection could have been assembled "under the radar" is remarkable. A whole case of cumengites!

Thank you so very much Eloïse for a great record of a great event.

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PostPosted: Oct 23, 2013 10:15    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

Thank you Eloïse Gaillou for the wonderful report and pictures.

Don

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PostPosted: Oct 23, 2013 13:47    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

http://youtube/JKDsSHLu7pE
(link normalized by FMF)

Ploum,

The link you have published and that we normalized is not working. Maybe you refer to this link?:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEjQyFW8H6w

or maybe this other?:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDogtbQBTZ0
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PostPosted: Oct 24, 2013 00:38    Post subject: Re: Grand Opening of the MIM Museum in Beirut, Libanon October 12th 2013  

This film is good:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKDsSHLu7pE
(link normalized by FMF)
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PostPosted: Jul 05, 2014 14:32    Post subject: The MIM Museum in Beirut, Lebanon - Images of the Collection  

After a while the team of the MIM Museum curators kindly supplied to all FMFers a kind of treasure: high quality images of many specimens of the Museum, starting with 24 fine examples of the marvels that the MIM Museum contains. As the time allows the Museum staff will prepare more and more images. Stay tuned, as you will see it deserves!

Please remember that the copyright of all these images belongs to the MIM museum as well as the descriptive texts.

To complete this first thread with the first batch of the images, we add few words written by Salim Edde the "alma mater" (and "alma pater") of this exceptional Museum.

Thank you MIM, thank you Salim!

Started as a hobby in 1997, the collection of Salim Edde (Beirut, Lebanon) evolved by acquiring high level minerals from new finds as well as from prominent collections around the world. In 2004 it was decided to transform this hobby into a museum of mineralogy :

√ that would be non-profit
√ that would reach the greatest number of people
√ that would highlight the following aspects:
    • esthetic and artistic
    • scientific and mathematic
    • historical
    • industrial and economic
    • academic
√ that would be adapted to the Arab world (and therefore trilingual: Arabic-French-English)
√ with the goal of promoting the science, culture, language and image of Lebanon, Salim Edde’s country.

The construction began in early 2010 and the museum was inaugurated in October 2013.


http://www.mim.museum
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEjQyFW8H6w
http://www.timeoutbeirut.com/thingstodo/listing/3398/mim-museum.html



Cheralite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Cheralite
 Locality:
Mount Malosa, Zomba District, Malawi
 Dimensions: 5,5 x 3,0 x 3,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 5,2 cm
Double terminated composite crystal (probably metamict); small crystals of aegirine and microcline.
MIM number 828
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30759 Time(s)

Cheralite - MIM Museum.jpg



Legrandite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Legrandite
 Locality:
Ojuela Mine, Mapimí, Municipio Mapimí, Durango, Mexico
 Dimensions: 5,5 x 3,0 x 3,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 3,3 cm
Sheaf of sharp-edged, yellow crystals in the form of a daisy on limonite
MIM number 961
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30884 Time(s)

Legrandite - MIM Museum.jpg



Hessite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Hessite
 Locality:
Botes (Botești), Zlatna, Alba, Transylvania, Romania
 Dimensions: 3,0 x 3,0 x 4,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 3,0 cm
Large rectangular crystal with smaller, rounded adventitious crystals; microcrystals of quartz at the base
MIM number 1024
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30723 Time(s)

Hessite - MIM Museum.jpg



Ilvaite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Ilvaite
 Locality:
Huanggang Mines, Hexigten Banner (Kèshíkèténg Qí), Ulanhad (Chifeng), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
 Dimensions: 36,0 x 18,0 x 12,5 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 9,0 cm
Massive block of hedenbergite topped with greenish quartz crystals in the midldle of which 6 ilvaite crystals have developed, including 2 made of multiple crystals; the faces are brilliant and the terminations polysynthetic and rather sharp-edged.
MIM number 1344
Photographer : AINU / Alessandro Clemenza
 Viewed:  30772 Time(s)

Ilvaite - MIM Museum.jpg



Bazzite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Bazzite
 Locality:
Bois Kersy, Vallée de la Tarentaise, Bonneval-Tarentaise, La Lauzière Massif, Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, Savoie, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France
 Dimensions: 9,0 x 7,0 x 3,5 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 0,7 cm
Leptynite plate with on one hand a plating of small blue crystals in the form of simple hexagonal prisms extending over 23 mm, and on the other hand a large spindle-shaped crystal covered in chlorite; an ilmenite of 3 mm is on the back of the plate. Analysis of the bazzite crystals revealed a proportion of 1.92% Al2O3 and 11.59% Sc2O3 in mass, or an average of 4.4 scandium cations for 1 aluminum cation.
MIM number 1347
Photographer : AINU / Alessandro Clemenza
 Viewed:  30864 Time(s)

Bazzite - MIM Museum.jpg



Millerite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Millerite
 Locality:
Estabrook Park, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, USA
 Dimensions: 4,0 x 3,5 x 4,5 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 2,5 cm
Divergent tuft of thin, golden needles in the form of broom planted on a whitish gangue.
MIM number 1366
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30752 Time(s)

Millerite - MIM Museum.jpg



Siderite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Siderite
 Locality:
Saint-Pierre-de-Mésage, Vizille, Grenoble, Isère, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France
 Dimensions: 19,0 x 17,0 x 9,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 10,5 cm
Floating plate in the form of the spread fingers of a hand; the crystals are perfectly rhombohedral, elongated and covered on some faces by quartz needles; the ensemble is floating and intact: It must have detached in the mine and then recrystallized before being covered in quartz.
MIM number 1386
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30808 Time(s)

Siderite - MIM Museum.jpg



Mixite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Mixite
 Locality:
Hilarion Mine, Hilarion area, Kamariza Mines, Agios Konstantinos, Lavrion Mining District, Attikí (Attica) Prefecture, Greece
 Dimensions: 22,0 x 16,0 x 6,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 0,9 cm
Tufts of apple green needles sprinkled on a matrix of friable limonite (variety of mixite apparently not containing calcium, which would have given it a lighter color)
MIM number 1405
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30734 Time(s)

Mixite - MIM Museum.jpg



Sternbergite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Sternbergite
 Locality:
Shaft 371, 1100 level, Schlema-Hartenstein District, Erzgebirge, Saxony/Sachsen, Germany
 Dimensions: 12,0 x 7,0 x 5,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 0,7 cm
Group of slightly rounded, gray crystals on a martix of lenticular siderite with dolomite on the other side of the plate.
MIM number 1417
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30776 Time(s)

Sternbergite - MIM Museum.jpg



Atelestite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Atelestite
 Locality:
Pajsberg, Persberg District, Filipstad, Värmland, Sweden
 Dimensions: 7,0 x 5,0 x 2,5 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 0,9 cm
Beige tufts on a limonite matrix.
MIM number 1419
Photographer : AINU / Alessandro Clemenza
 Viewed:  30733 Time(s)

Atelestite - MIM Museum.jpg



Anglesite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Anglesite
 Locality:
Touissit, Touissit District, Jerada Province, Oriental Region, Morocco
 Dimensions: 13,5 x 12,0 x 6,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 4,0 cm
Tuft of parallelepipedal crystals with pointy ends in the form of a daisy, with transparent yellow central crystals and peripheral crystals forming a corolla of gray color with an inclusion of galena.
MIM number 1422
Photographer : Jeff Scovil
 Viewed:  30921 Time(s)

Anglesite - MIM Museum.jpg



Scheelite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Scheelite
 Locality:
Huanggang Mines, Hexigten Banner (Kèshíkèténg Qí), Ulanhad (Chifeng), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
 Dimensions: 17,0 x 11,5 x 9,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 7,5 cm
Large crystal with perfectly smooth faces, transparent in its upper part and colorless with silvery inclusions at the edges of Molybdénite. The crystal is surrounded by small strips of white calcite.
MIM number 1426
Photographer : AINU / Alessandro Clemenza
 Viewed:  30745 Time(s)

Scheelite - MIM Museum.jpg



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keldjarn




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PostPosted: Jul 06, 2014 04:15    Post subject: Re: The MIM Museum in Beirut, Lebanon  

Thanks for uploading the pictures of the fabulous specimens in the MIM museum.
The first pircture is of an alleged "Cheralite" from Mt. Malosa, Malawi. I purchased a similar looking specimen in Tucson a few years ago and XRD/EDS studies performed at the Oslo University Mineralogical Museum revealed a part pseudomorph with a core of Monazite-Ce and a pseudomorphed part of Synchysite-(Ce) and Rhabdophane-(Ce).
Cerium-minerals are frequently found at Mt. Malosa but Thorium does not seem to be an important element in the pegmatites. I have never seen any analytical data to support the occurence of "Cheralite" at Mt. Malosa.

Further "Atelesite" has never been reported from the mines at Pajsberg. The specimen looks like Brandtite crystals on Caryopilite from the Harstigen mine, Pajsberg ore field, Filipstad, Sweden.

Knut
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Jordi Fabre
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PostPosted: Jul 06, 2014 11:54    Post subject: Re: The MIM Museum in Beirut, Lebanon  

keldjarn wrote:
...The first pircture is of an alleged "Cheralite" from Mt. Malosa, Malawi. I purchased a similar looking specimen in Tucson a few years ago and XRD/EDS studies performed at the Oslo University Mineralogical Museum revealed a part pseudomorph with a core of Monazite-Ce and a pseudomorphed part of Synchysite-(Ce) and Rhabdophane-(Ce).
Cerium-minerals are frequently found at Mt. Malosa but Thorium does not seem to be an important element in the pegmatites. I have never seen any analytical data to support the occurence of "Cheralite" at Mt. Malosa.

Further "Atelesite" has never been reported from the mines at Pajsberg. The specimen looks like Brandtite crystals on Caryopilite from the Harstigen mine, Pajsberg ore field, Filipstad, Sweden...

Thank you very much Knut.

The staff of the MIM Museum already saw your concerns and they will work on it to know more about the proper identification of these two species.
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MIM Museum




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PostPosted: Jul 06, 2014 12:50    Post subject: The MIM Museum in Beirut, Lebanon - Images of the Collection / 2  

And here you have the second half of the first batch.

Enjoy them! ;-)



Galena - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Galena
 Locality:
Denton Mine, Goose Creek Mine group, Harris Creek Sub-District, Hardin County, Illinois, USA
 Dimensions: 11,2 x 8,0 x 7,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 6,2 cm
Three interpenetrating crystals of galena, in the shape of modified cubes with microcrystals of chalcopyrite in the interstices, having developed above an aggregate of purple fluorite crystals of which the largest measures 5.5 cm
MIM number 1464
Photographer : FMI / James Elliott
 Viewed:  30492 Time(s)

Galena - MIM Museum.jpg



Bournonite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Bournonite
 Locality:
Víboras Mine, Machacamarca, Machacamarca District, Cornelio Saavedra Province, Potosí Department, Bolivia
 Dimensions: 23,0 x 20,0 x 20,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 4,5 cm
Very lustrous crystals in the shape of wheels and scattered on a light-colored gangue studded with quartz microcrystals.
MIM number 1473
Photographer : FMI / James Elliott
 Viewed:  30535 Time(s)

Bournonite - MIM Museum.jpg



Zincite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Zincite
 Locality:
Furnace Quarry, Franklin Marble, Franklin, Franklin Mining District, Sussex County, New Jersey, USA
 Dimensions: 2,5 x 5,0 x 3,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 2,3 cm
Opaque, dark red crystal in the shape of a hexagonal pyramid and clearly exhibiting hemihedry; on its front face the crystal has been extricated from the hodgkinsonite in which it had developed.
MIM number 1475
Photographer : FMI / James Elliott
 Viewed:  30490 Time(s)

Zincite - MIM Museum.jpg



Ilvaite with Hedenbergite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Ilvaite with Hedenbergite and Quartz
 Locality:
Huanggang Mines, Hexigten Banner (Kèshíkèténg Qí), Ulanhad (Chifeng), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
 Dimensions: 23,0 x 26,0 x 16,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size: 16,00 cm
Two large, intact, very lustrous, black polysynthetic crystals rising from a massive hedenbergite matrix sprinkled with greenish quartz points; a smaller adventitious ilvaite.
MIM number 1483
Photographer : FMI / James Elliott
 Viewed:  30800 Time(s)

Ilvaite with Hedenbergite - MIM Museum.jpg



Cassiterite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Cassiterite
 Locality:
Horní Slavkov (Schlaggenwald), Karlovy Vary Region, Bohemia, Czech Republic
 Dimensions: 23,5 x 13,0 x 6,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 3,3 cm
Block of white quartz crystals, slightly tinted by iron oxides and sprinkled with cyclic twins of lustrous black cassiterite.
MIM number 1499
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30549 Time(s)

Cassiterite - MIM Museum.jpg



Prehnite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Prehnite
 Locality:
Jeffrey Mine, Asbestos, Les Sources RCM, Estrie, Québec, Canada
 Dimensions: 9,5 x 6,5 x 9,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 2,1 cm
Pseudo-cubic crystals, brown-green and well separated, having grown on either side of a thin base.
MIM number 1501
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30516 Time(s)

Prehnite - MIM Museum.jpg



Gypsum - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Gypsum
 Locality:
Niccioleta Mine, Massa Marittima, Grosseto Province, Tuscany, Italy
 Dimensions: 18,0 x 10,0 x 14,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 12,4 cm
Large transparent, striated prism of gypsum with unusual inclusions of sulfur crystals inside, the largest measuring 3 cm.
MIM number 1502
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30514 Time(s)

Gypsum - MIM Museum.jpg



Catapleiite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Catapleiite
 Locality:
Poudrette Quarry, Mont Saint-Hilaire, La Vallée-du-Richelieu RCM, Montérégie, Québec, Canada
 Dimensions: 11,0 x 4,5 x 10,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 6,0 cm
Large, thick rosette of lustrous parallel crystals with transparent terminations, well developed on back and front.
MIM number 1503
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30561 Time(s)

Catapleiite - MIM Museum.jpg



Orthoclase - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Orthoclase
 Locality:
Shigar Valley, Skardu District, Baltistan, Gilgit-Baltistan (Northern Areas), Pakistan
 Dimensions: 40,0 x 25,0 x 23,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 17,0 cm
Two large, very sharp, lustrous white orthoclase crystals on a massive orthoclase base covered in thick tablets of mica, small black schorl crystals and a few very light pink apatite crystals. The orthoclase crystals are Baveno law twins.
MIM number 1518
Photographer : FMI / James Elliott
 Viewed:  30507 Time(s)

Orthoclase - MIM Museum.jpg



Fluorite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Fluorite
 Locality:
Redburn Mine, Rookhope, Weardale, North Pennines Orefield, County Durham, England, United Kingdom
 Dimensions: 15,0 x 20,0 x 17,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 3,1 cm
Floating matrix of small white quartz tips covered on the upper face by transparent, purple cubes of twinned fluorite.
MIM number 1521
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30602 Time(s)

Fluorite - MIM Museum.jpg



Barite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Barite
 Locality:
Jebel Ouichane Mines, Beni Bou Ifrour, Nador, Nador Province, Oriental Region, Morocco
 Dimensions: 16,0 x 11,0 x 25,0 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 8,0 cm
Complex aggregate of slender pointed translucent pale blue crystals resembling a cedar tree, perched a top a black rigid matrix.
MIM number 1549
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30625 Time(s)

Barite - MIM Museum.jpg



Anhydrite - MIM Museum.jpg
 Mineral: Anhydrite
 Locality:
Campiano Mine, Montieri, Grosseto Province, Tuscany, Italy
 Dimensions: 22,0 x 15,0 x 10,5 cm
 Description:
Main crystal size : 16,0 cm
Group of white lamellar and parallel crystals with perfectly formed wedge shaped terminations.
MIM number 1567
Photographer : AINU / Augustin de Valence
 Viewed:  30451 Time(s)

Anhydrite - MIM Museum.jpg



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Jim




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PostPosted: Jul 06, 2014 13:22    Post subject: Re: The MIM Museum in Beirut, Lebanon  

Jordi,

Thanks for these outstanding images. Everyone who knew the collection Salim was building as it was happening was waiting eagerly for the final unveiling.

His vision and discipline are inspirational!

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