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19 Oct-01:33:53 Hematite (Recovering - Academic)
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Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals
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Pierre Joubert




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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 03:04    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Fascinating stuff! I had a fly fishing friend, who was an ex pilot, who had a whole little home factory where he built small scale locomotives as a hobby. He also made most hardware things he needed, himself. I will be following this tread with great interest.
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R Saunders




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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 07:14    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

My model oil well. Brass is made of copper and zinc.


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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 08:54    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

This is a very interesting pursuit; please continue to share from your collection. I think it's very interesting that most of the d-block elements are very similar in appearance with the exception of gold and copper. Without the labels, one might assume they were identical and yet their properties are so distinct.

Can you comment on the inclusion of Lutetium as a d-block element rather than a Lanthanide?
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Recovering - Academic




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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 16:05    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Fine work. I really wish young people would get involved in the mechanical arts, so they can use their hands to do more than just play with a mobile phone.
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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 16:15    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

dontgogreen wrote:
This is a very interesting pursuit; please continue to share from your collection. I think it's very interesting that most of the d-block elements are very similar in appearance with the exception of gold and copper. Without the labels, one might assume they were identical and yet their properties are so distinct.

Can you comment on the inclusion of Lutetium as a d-block element rather than a Lanthanide?


Actually when you get close to the metals each does possess a distinct hue. Osmium for example is a beautiful pale blue colour, and zinc does show a distinct bluish cast. It is difficult to show this in a single photograph as the table is so large, but I might post some pictures of each of the ingots to highlight their uniqueness with respect to colour.

My table is based on the ‘long version’ where the s-block and the d-block elements are kept at arm’s length by the lanthanide and the actinide elements. This then requires Lu to be placed with its family Sc and Y. There have been a lot of heated debates about where Lu should be placed in the periodic table. I think the long version puts an end to the debate.
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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 16:20    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

The lanthanides are a unique group of metals. With the exception of Europium all the lanthanides before Gadolinium do not require any elaborate storage techniques. Despite what has been said, my experience has shown that they are relatively stable in dry air and can be stored for a very long time, years in fact, under argon or dry oil with little observable change.

The flask or apothecary bottle that I will use to display the lanthanide metals is shown below. It is 150 mm long made of 5 mm thick borosilicate glass. The opening has an ID of 45 mm and the widest ID is 80 mm. I have yet to design a suitable stopper, but I am thinking of using either Teflon or Delrin, and I will make the stoppers on my metal turning lathe. I am still deciding on the style of the display cabinet, and the material but polished oak might be a good choice. This I will also make at home.



LANTHANIDE APOTHECARY BOTTLE 1.jpg
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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 16:21    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Another view.


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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 16:24    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Below is a photo of some of my Samarium, which has proven to be very stable in air. The sample shown weighs 600 grams. It occurs as 100 mm long dendritic crystals, and resembles some of the Kongsberg silver specimens I have seen. I suspect the sample was prepared by vacuum distillation. The assay sheet that came with the metal claims a purity of 99.99% TREM.


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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 16:25    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

A look at Samarium 2


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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 16:58    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Below is a photo of my Ytterbium (800 gram) ingot. I could be biased, but I think it is an absolutely beautiful metal. For the purpose of display I will most likely exhibit the side shown in the middle photo. I am still deciding on how to fit the various pieces into their respective apothecary flasks, but I might have to place a plastic substrate on the bottom of the flask to limit the movement of the metal, and perhaps use some form of hidden LED lighting. The wall thickness of the flasks is only 5mm. I do want to make the display of museum quality, which when you make things yourself is not too difficult or expensive. Raw materials are very cheap!


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dontgogreen




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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 16:58    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Thanks for the explanation. Are there any elements that are particularly difficult for you to obtain?
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Pete Modreski
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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 17:22    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Thank you for sharing all of this with our group. Your machine creations, and your periodic table specimens, are all superb, and all your interesting comments are much appreciated. I'll look forward to seeing more, and your mineral specimen collections too.
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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 17:29    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

dontgogreen wrote:
Thanks for the explanation. Are there any elements that are particularly difficult for you to obtain?


It all depends on your locality. Most metals can be obtained from China, especially the lanthanides. There are two legally registered companies – one in the UK and another in Austria - that supply most metals but you will pay a high price. The actinides are almost impossible to get in any reasonable amount. Am-241 is very easy to get. You can get it from your local hardware store in the form of a smoke detector. These smoke detectors retail for about $4USD.

Avoid chemical suppliers wherever possible – they are just too expensive. For example a 1Kg ingot of Cerium (99.99%) will cost $11,000USD from a well-known chemical supplier but can be sourced from China for about $100USD plus postage.

Mining companies are a good source, especially those with their own foundries. You can also get ‘chip-grade’ silicon (99.9999%) and germanium (99.9999%) from companies that manufacture electronic components. I bought four ‘chip-grade’ silicon wafers each 100 mm wide and 10 mm thick from a company that does work in Silicon Valley. Each wafer cost $10USD and was designated as a reject. This company also supplied me with chip grade germanium wafers 100 mm wide and 3 mm thick. A silicon foundry supplied me with a free 3Kg sample of 99.9% silicon.

The general rule of thumb is the higher the purity the more expensive it will cost.
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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 18:09    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

A FMF contributor asked about the difficulty of obtaining the elements. So below is a photo of a chip-grade germanium silicon wafer. It is actually one-quarter of the original wafer, which was too big to fit into my block which is 100 mm x 100 mm x 40 mm. The chips were supplied by a company that is located in Flower Mound, Texas. The company is owned and operated by a group of the friendliest, most professional and most scrumptious young women one could meet. They even sent me a Christmas card some months after the purchase that really made me feel good! I did not spend a lot of money, but they still sent me the card.

The wafer is designated as 4” N <111> 5-40 OHM 889-940 um thick, and was really inexpensive.



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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 18:11    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Chip grade silicon from same supplier.


Note the blue cast.



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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 18:17    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Pete Modreski wrote:
Thank you for sharing all of this with our group. Your machine creations, and your periodic table specimens, are all superb, and all your interesting comments are much appreciated. I'll look forward to seeing more, and your mineral specimen collections too.


I will post my minerals – truly. They just do not seem to be as photogenic as the machines and the elements. I recently bought a digital microscope so I could take some really nice close-up photos. And I am building a few things to help me photograph my minerals. They do really look nice to the eye, but they refuse to photograph well. Most of my recent acquisitions are in the small to large cabinet range.
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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 19:08    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Finally I have decided to post my first mineral photo. I state from the outset that I am not happy with the photo as it does not do the specimen justice.

It is Malachite after Azurite from the Milpillas Mine, Sonora, Mexico. The specimen is 14 cm x 6 cm x 5 cm and weights 400 grams. The highlight of the piece is the large ‘pseudo’ crystal at the bottom which measures about 5 cm tip-to-tip and is 15 mm thick. It also contains a few smaller ‘pseudo’ crystals too.



Milpillas Mine, Sonora, Mexico MALACHITE 1.jpg
 Mineral: Malachite after Azurite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 14 cm x 6 cm x 5 cm. Main crystal size: 5 cm. x 1.5 cm.
 Description:
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Milpillas Mine, Sonora, Mexico MALACHITE 1.jpg



Milpillas Mine, Sonora, Mexico MALACHITE 2.jpg
 Mineral: Malachite after Azurite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 14 cm x 6 cm x 5 cm. Main crystal size: 5 cm. x 1.5 cm.
 Description:
 Viewed:  460 Time(s)

Milpillas Mine, Sonora, Mexico MALACHITE 2.jpg



Milpillas Mine, Sonora, Mexico MALACHITE 3.jpg
 Mineral: Malachite after Azurite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 14 cm x 6 cm x 5 cm. Main crystal size: 5 cm. x 1.5 cm.
 Description:
 Viewed:  459 Time(s)

Milpillas Mine, Sonora, Mexico MALACHITE 3.jpg



Milpillas Mine, Sonora, MexicoMALACHITE 4.jpg
 Mineral: Malachite after Azurite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 14 cm x 6 cm x 5 cm. Main crystal size: 5 cm. x 1.5 cm.
 Description:
 Viewed:  460 Time(s)

Milpillas Mine, Sonora, MexicoMALACHITE 4.jpg



ilpillas Mine, Sonora, MexicoMALACHITE 5.jpg
 Mineral: Malachite after Azurite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 14 cm x 6 cm x 5 cm. Main crystal size: 5 cm. x 1.5 cm.
 Description:
 Viewed:  459 Time(s)

ilpillas Mine, Sonora, MexicoMALACHITE 5.jpg


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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 21:21    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

Azurite on matrix Milpillas Mine

This is one of my matrix pieces. The specimen is 9 cm x 5 cm x 5 cm. I took the photo at a different location using a different light.



MILPILLAS AZURITE MATRIX 3.jpg
 Mineral: Azurite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 9 cm x 5 cm x 5 cm
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MILPILLAS AZURITE MATRIX 3.jpg


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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 21:45    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

I decided to photograph the Milpillas azurite specimen at another location – my office desk with natural light to the front. I am happier with these photos, but they still do not do the specimen justice.

The largest blocky crystal nested in the center is 3.5 cm long and all the crystals have the highest wet look luster. The specimen is 7 cm wide, 5 cm tall and 3 cm deep. The matrix is solid azurite with a very thin coating of white Dickite, front and back, where it came off the opposing seam walls.



AZURITE WITH DICKITE 1.jpg
 Mineral: Azurite with Dickite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 7 cm x 5 cm x 3 cm. Main crystal: 3.5 cm long
 Description:
 Viewed:  529 Time(s)

AZURITE WITH DICKITE 1.jpg



AZURITE WITH DICKITE 2.jpg
 Mineral: Azurite with Dickite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 7 cm x 5 cm x 3 cm. Main crystal: 3.5 cm long
 Description:
 Viewed:  446 Time(s)

AZURITE WITH DICKITE 2.jpg



AZURITE WITH DICKITE 3.jpg
 Mineral: Azurite with Dickite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 7 cm x 5 cm x 3 cm. Main crystal: 3.5 cm long
 Description:
 Viewed:  444 Time(s)

AZURITE WITH DICKITE 3.jpg



AZURITE WITH DICKITE 4.jpg
 Mineral: Azurite with Dickite
 Locality:
Milpillas Mine, Cuitaca, Municipio Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico
 Dimensions: 7 cm x 5 cm x 3 cm. Main crystal: 3.5 cm long
 Description:
 Viewed:  445 Time(s)

AZURITE WITH DICKITE 4.jpg


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Peter Lemkin




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PostPosted: Sep 25, 2018 23:02    Post subject: Re: Collection of Machines, Metals and Minerals  

dontgogreen wrote:
Thanks for the explanation. Are there any elements that are particularly difficult for you to obtain?


The two he just showed are difficult to obtain. I was going to ask just where you are getting these rare metals? I know there are specialty companies that supply them for industry and science - but would think they don't much care to sell small quantities [which wouldn't be very cheap despite their small size].
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