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Mining objects.
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Sante Celiberti




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PostPosted: Apr 11, 2020 19:23    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

Hi, Michael.

I confirm my first impression: very nice objects and lovingly preserved. Bravo!



IMG_20200408_190434[1].jpg
 Mineral: Electric bell
 Locality:
Gavorrano Mine, Gavorrano, Grosseto Province, Tuscany, Italy
 Description:
This electric bell was the only contact between the worker in charge of the winch and the cage going down and up. The communication took place through a coded number of rings and nothing else.Eight hundred meters of anguish!
 Viewed:  4365 Time(s)

IMG_20200408_190434[1].jpg


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Joseph DOliveira




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PostPosted: Apr 12, 2020 19:48    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

While not a true mining object, I thought I would share this sculpture. It is called "The Geologist", and depicts a German geologist in full attire, complete with rock sample in hand. It is by Friedrich Reusch, cast of bronze in the late 1800's. I was fortunate to acquire it through an auction in California in the late 1990's.


IMG_2576 (2).JPG
 Description:
 Viewed:  4310 Time(s)

IMG_2576 (2).JPG



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Sante Celiberti




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PostPosted: Apr 13, 2020 01:05    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

Very beautiful and important sculpture, worthy of a museum.
Many compliments, Joseph.

Greetings from Tuscany.
Sante



IMG_20200408_183902[1].jpg
 Mineral: Carbide lamp
 Description:
 Viewed:  4289 Time(s)

IMG_20200408_183902[1].jpg


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Michael Shaw
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PostPosted: Apr 13, 2020 08:33    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

more mining related objects


Justrite Carbide Cannister.jpg
 Mineral: Cannister for carrying carbide
 Description:
 Viewed:  4268 Time(s)

Justrite Carbide Cannister.jpg



Guy's Dropper Lamp.jpg
 Mineral: Guy's Dropper carbide lamp
 Description:
 Viewed:  4265 Time(s)

Guy's Dropper Lamp.jpg



Miner's ID Tags.jpg
 Mineral: Miner's ID tags
 Description:
 Viewed:  4267 Time(s)

Miner's ID Tags.jpg


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Joseph DOliveira




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PostPosted: Apr 13, 2020 09:21    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

Here is one of my special pieces, it is a Pajari (Tropari) instrument used to determine the dip and direction of diamond drill holes. It has a gimballed compass sphere that encases a watch works. The sphere is set to free float and the watch mechanism is wound before inserting the instrument into the borehole with the diamond drill rods.

When the instrument reaches the bottom of the drill hole the watch mechanism activates and the sphere is locked in place. The Tropari is retrieved and the dip and direction of the borehole is displayed on the compass face. A very tedious but unique way to plot diamond drill hole dip and direction.



IMG_2608 (2).JPG
 Description:
 Viewed:  4259 Time(s)

IMG_2608 (2).JPG



IMG_2612 (2).JPG
 Dimensions: 5x2.5 cm
 Description:
The compass face.
 Viewed:  4258 Time(s)

IMG_2612 (2).JPG



IMG_2615 (2).JPG
 Description:
The rear of the compass showing the hatched area used to wind the watch mechanism
 Viewed:  4263 Time(s)

IMG_2615 (2).JPG



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Sante Celiberti




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PostPosted: Apr 13, 2020 19:25    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

Michael, your objects are very beautiful, but I really like the care with which you keep them.
Warm greetings.

Joseph, This is a beautiful and very interesting instrument that I had never seen before.
My compliments.

The next object is almost nothing, but I post it for two reasons: first because it is a fresh gift from a few hours ago by an ex-miner (my neighbor); secondly because, by giving it to me, he explained to me other operations that were carried out in the mine.
And I like hearing his stories and learning something new about mining.

1) Old tools that could no longer be used in the mine were given to miners who requested them. The same thing for pieces of wood or iron, especially the old rails of the wagons (I have seen in our villages many houses of miners in whose constructions these old rails have been used).
But a new tool, like in this case?
Well, with a written request to the mine management it was possible to get it in some occasion (better to give than to be robbed).
2) This widia tip is a model prior to the one with the diamond spheres previously posted by me and Vic Rzonca (which could no longer be used when the spheres jumped off). In this widia model the termination could be rolled up. In fact, it was rolled up, in the mine itself, every two days of use, by a worker assigned exclusively to this task, who by regulation could not work alone in the subsoil and therefore had a companion who just looked at him!
3) This type of tip had a specific function and only that: to prepare holes in the vaults of the tunnels to apply nail plates in order to consolidate them and avoid the detachment of rock (or massive pyrite itself).
The spiked plates were prepared in the mine by hand. In the last years of activity, so called "French" nails were introduced: they were bifurcated (expanding) and had a length of 25-30 cm and a diameter just greater than that of this tip.

This and much more can tell such an insignificant object!

Warm greetings and stay safe.
Sante



IMG_20200413_193428.jpg
 Mineral: Drill bit
 Locality:
Boccheggiano Mines, Montieri, Grosseto Province, Tuscany, Italy
 Dimensions: 12 cm
 Description:
 Viewed:  4229 Time(s)

IMG_20200413_193428.jpg


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Joseph DOliveira




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PostPosted: Apr 13, 2020 21:31    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

Interesting to see the gold paint on the drill bit, as different colours of paint were used to identify the various sizes (diameter) of the bits. After graduation, I worked in a mine as a jackleg driller for a short stint. At the start of shift, you would pick up your bit bag and they would be sorted by size and painted accordingly. The gold bits were the largest, as you drilled a hole, the bit would wear and the diameter of the hole would shrink. When you changed bits to deepen the hole, a bit of smaller diameter had to be used, the paint made it easier to identify the new bit. Brings back memories.

Sante Celiberti wrote:
Michael, your objects are very beautiful, but I really like the care with which you keep them.
Warm greetings.

Joseph, This is a beautiful and very interesting instrument that I had never seen before.
My compliments.

The next object is almost nothing, but I post it for two reasons: first because it is a fresh gift from a few hours ago by an ex-miner (my neighbor); secondly because, by giving it to me, he explained to me other operations that were carried out in the mine.
And I like hearing his stories and learning something new about mining.

1) Old tools that could no longer be used in the mine were given to miners who requested them. The same thing for pieces of wood or iron, especially the old rails of the wagons (I have seen in our villages many houses of miners in whose constructions these old rails have been used).
But a new tool, like in this case?
Well, with a written request to the mine management it was possible to get it in some occasion (better to give than to be robbed).
2) This widia tip is a model prior to the one with the diamond spheres previously posted by me and Vic Rzonca (which could no longer be used when the spheres jumped off). In this widia model the termination could be rolled up. In fact, it was rolled up, in the mine itself, every two days of use, by a worker assigned exclusively to this task, who by regulation could not work alone in the subsoil and therefore had a companion who just looked at him!
3) This type of tip had a specific function and only that: to prepare holes in the vaults of the tunnels to apply nail plates in order to consolidate them and avoid the detachment of rock (or massive pyrite itself).
The spiked plates were prepared in the mine by hand. In the last years of activity, so called "French" nails were introduced: they were bifurcated (expanding) and had a length of 25-30 cm and a diameter just greater than that of this tip.

This and much more can tell such an insignificant object!

Warm greetings and stay safe.
Sante

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Sante Celiberti




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PostPosted: Apr 14, 2020 17:09    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

Hi, Joseph.

Thanks for these informations.
A new and interesting addition to the mining knowledge.

Greetings. Take care.
Sante



IMG_20200408_183946[1].jpg
 Mineral: Carbide lamp
 Description:
 Viewed:  4158 Time(s)

IMG_20200408_183946[1].jpg


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Michael Shaw
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PostPosted: Apr 16, 2020 08:27    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

A few more....


Assay Crucible.jpg
 Mineral: Assay crucible
 Description:
 Viewed:  4078 Time(s)

Assay Crucible.jpg



Hercules Blasting Cap Tin.jpg
 Mineral: Blasting cap tin
 Description:
 Viewed:  4077 Time(s)

Hercules Blasting Cap Tin.jpg



Koehler Permissable Safety Lamp.jpg
 Mineral: Safety Lamp
 Description:
 Viewed:  4080 Time(s)

Koehler Permissable Safety Lamp.jpg


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Sante Celiberti




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PostPosted: Dec 03, 2020 16:57    Post subject: Re: Mining objects.  

Hello.

These humble hand-made pliers from Niccioleta mine give me the opportunity to tell a rule that existed in the mines of Tuscan metalliferous hills in the first half of the last century.
While the hiring of miners took place without preliminary examination, the hiring of specialized staff such as mechanics, blacksmiths and carpenters required an examination of their working skills.
The blacksmiths were required by a mine technician to make an iron tool without using any machinery, except a forge, anvil and hammer. And this is because during the mining activity a particular tool not available on the market could become necessary.
The blacksmith had to be able to understand which tool could be more appropriate to the case and, above all, be able to make it perfectly and quickly.



IMG_20201203_190546.jpg
 Mineral: Hand-made pliers
 Locality:
Niccioleta Mine, Massa Marittima, Grosseto Province, Tuscany, Italy
 Dimensions: 45 cm
 Description:
 Viewed:  713 Time(s)

IMG_20201203_190546.jpg



IMG_20201203_190528.jpg
 Mineral: Hand-made pliers
 Locality:
Niccioleta Mine, Massa Marittima, Grosseto Province, Tuscany, Italy
 Dimensions: 45 cm
 Description:
Detail.
 Viewed:  714 Time(s)

IMG_20201203_190528.jpg


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