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Silvia's Collection
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silvia




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PostPosted: Aug 31, 2022 12:48    Post subject: Re: Silvia's Collection  

I do love the Hematite and Pyrite specimens from Elba. Sulphides are a key element of our collection.
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PostPosted: Sep 02, 2022 18:22    Post subject: Re: Silvia's Collection  

Without doubt a nice piece, but all specimens from this find went (unfortunately???) to the lab and were submitted to chemical treatment, supposedly for stabilizing and preserve them from decomposing or oxidation in the near future.
Due to this treatment, the pyrites changed their colour to cold metallic-whitish and lost therefore their so typical and wonderful natural yellowish "fools-gold" hue, which can only be admired in specimens unearthed decades ago
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PostPosted: Sep 03, 2022 14:18    Post subject: Re: Silvia's Collection  

minsur wrote:
Without doubt a nice piece, but all specimens from this find went (unfortunately???) to the lab and were submitted to chemical treatment, supposedly for stabilizing and preserve them from decomposing or oxidation in the near future.
Due to this treatment, the pyrites changed their colour to cold metallic-whitish and lost therefore their so typical and wonderful natural yellowish "fools-gold" hue, which can only be admired in specimens unearthed decades ago


Actually the photo was a tough one to take. The Pyrite crystals are truly a beautiful golden (fools gold) colour, but the camera sensor cannot resolve the true colour or perhaps I am just a bad photographer.

I know many specimens were sent to the lab, but some were extracted as is mine included. I have a video of the mining operation.

My partner and I have never had a problem with Pyrite rot well not yet, and we have many Pyrite specimens from many localities, including Elba, that have been in our collection for over 40 years.

I just took the Elba specimen out of the cabinet to view it again, and I can assure you that the Pyrites are as golden as those we have from Peru, Kosovo, Portugal, China, Australia and the USA.
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PostPosted: Sep 04, 2022 03:14    Post subject: Re: Silvia's Collection  

Sadly, living in the UK in an old house (so high humidity), about 90% of my specimens that contain pyrite have had to 'leave' the collection. Navajun pyrite seems to be stable but little else is.
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PostPosted: Sep 04, 2022 15:19    Post subject: Re: Silvia's Collection  

James Catmur wrote:
Sadly, living in the UK in an old house (so high humidity), about 90% of my specimens that contain pyrite have had to 'leave' the collection. Navajun pyrite seems to be stable but little else is.


Humidity has never been a problem the house is fully air-conditioned, but humidity has never been a problem even when the house was not air-conditioned. I think there are many other factors causing Pyrite rot.

We have Chinese Pyrite balls in our collection that were stored for several months in a very dank Chinese warehouse. These too display zero Pyrite rot. We even did a test by allowing one of the balls to sit outside for six months during the coldest and wettest part of the year. The result was zero oxidation. Most of the problems we have seen regarding Pyrite rot come from fine grained Pyrite specimens or specimens containing fine-grained Pyrite or specimens of sedimentary origin, but even in these instances, Pyrite rot is still problematic. Large, solid crystals seem to survive without problems.

Pyrite Rot and the Realgar problem

My partner has also built some oxygen free enclosures where certain specimens can be stored under nitrogen or argon. We hope to include Realgar in our collection, and my partner believes the alteration to Pararealgar is catalyzed by oxygen in the presence of light (green wavelengths?). Remove the oxygen and there is no alteration even in the presence of light.

If there is enough interest, I might be able to include information on how he makes these enclosures and how they can easily and routinely be flushed with argon or nitrogen. Oxygen free Argon and Nitrogen cylinders can be easily purchased these days from many outlets.
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PostPosted: Sep 05, 2022 13:32    Post subject: Minerals of the Quiruvilca Mine - Silvia's Collection  

An attractive rolling plate of botyroidal Native Arsenic recovered from Quiruvilca Mine.

Native arsenic has always been a rare phase at the Quiruvilca Mine. The only other documented occurrence of Native Arsenic occurred many years ago when large masses (> 50 mm) were found in one locality in the STIBNITE zone approximately 1.5 km WNW of the town of Shorey (See: Lewis, R.W., 1956; The geology and ore deposits of the Quiruvilca District, Peru: Economic Geology (1956) 51 (1): 4163.)

It is not known if the specimen was the product of recent mining (ca. 2013) or simply a specimen from a previous mining period formerly in the hands of a miner.

The quality of the Quiruvilca Native Arsenic specimens rivals those from Germany and the Czech Republic in my opinion.



01 - NATIVE ARSENIC - PERU - DISPLAY - VIEW 1.jpg
 Mineral: Arsenic
 Locality:
Quiruvilca Mine (La Libertad Mine), Quiruvilca District, Santiago de Chuco Province, La Libertad Department, Peru
 Dimensions: 13 cm x 8 cm x 2 cm
 Description:
Display view
 Viewed:  2606 Time(s)

01 - NATIVE ARSENIC - PERU - DISPLAY - VIEW 1.jpg



02 - NATIVE ARSENIC - PERU - MATRIX - VIEW 2.jpg
 Mineral: Arsenic
 Locality:
Quiruvilca Mine (La Libertad Mine), Quiruvilca District, Santiago de Chuco Province, La Libertad Department, Peru
 Dimensions: 13 cm x 8 cm x 2 cm
 Description:
Matrix view
 Viewed:  2606 Time(s)

02 - NATIVE ARSENIC - PERU - MATRIX - VIEW 2.jpg



03 - NATIVE ARSENIC - PERU - CLOSEUP 1.jpg
 Mineral: Arsenic
 Locality:
Quiruvilca Mine (La Libertad Mine), Quiruvilca District, Santiago de Chuco Province, La Libertad Department, Peru
 Dimensions: 13 cm x 8 cm x 2 cm
 Description:
Close-up 1
 Viewed:  2606 Time(s)

03 - NATIVE ARSENIC - PERU - CLOSEUP 1.jpg



04 - NATIVE ARSENIC - PERU - CLOSEUP 2.jpg
 Mineral: Arsenic
 Locality:
Quiruvilca Mine (La Libertad Mine), Quiruvilca District, Santiago de Chuco Province, La Libertad Department, Peru
 Dimensions: 13 cm x 8 cm x 2 cm
 Description:
Close-up 2
 Viewed:  2608 Time(s)

04 - NATIVE ARSENIC - PERU - CLOSEUP 2.jpg



04 - QUIRUVILCA MINE AND DISTRICT.jpg
 Mineral: `
 Locality:
Quiruvilca Mine (La Libertad Mine), Quiruvilca District, Santiago de Chuco Province, La Libertad Department, Peru
 Description:
A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO QUIRUVILCA

LOCATION:

The Quiruvilca Cu-Pb-Zn district is located in the District of Quiruvilca, Province of Santiago de Chuco, Department of La Libertad, approximately 76 km east of the city of Trujillo.

COLONIAL TIMES

Mining at Quiruvilca has a long and proud history. In 1789 Pedro Jose Gomez de Cal wrote to the Viceroy of Peru informing him that the area contained rich minerals of silver and that three men had made large fortunes there (see Santolalla, F.M., 1909, Estado actual de la mineria en Quiruvilca: Cuerpo de Ingenierias de Minas del Peru, 801. 75, 48 p.). Even today, the area has many surface workings typical of the Spanish and Portuguese mining methods during the Viceregal Years.

MODERN TIMES

Northern Peru Mining and Smelting Co (NPMS), which was a wholly own subsidiary of ASARCO Incorporated (ASARCO) mined the Quiruvilca property from 1925 to 1995. ASARCO initially focused on exploiting the copper bearing veins. Mining at Quiruvilca ceased in 1931, and re-opened in 1940 with the installation of a flotation plant at Shorey. By the late 1960s the Shorey mill was producing copper, lead and zinc concentrates from complex ore stock.

In early 1995 Pan American Silver (PAS) began acquiring the Quiruvilca Mine, and obtained full control of the property between September 1995 and March 1996. Pan American Silver mined the property from 1995 to 2012. (See PAS Annual reports for the period 1995 - 2012)

In June of 2012, PAS sold the Quiruvilca Mine to a Peruvian company called Quiruvilca Ltd, a subsidiary of the Canadian Mining Company called Southern Peaks Mining. In July 2015, Southern Peaks sold the mine to Bolivian citizen Luis Senz, who then declared bankruptcy and abandoned the mine in 2017.

In June 2020 Lida Resources Inc. acquired Quiruvilca Mine for $0.2 million USD. Lida plans to change the mining focus at Quiruvilca from a vein type silver mine to a high tonnage gold/copper mine. Perhaps they have plans to convert the mine to a very large open-cut operation.

Today, the Quiruvilca mine is considered an environmental time bomb and a visible source of contamination of the Moche River.

DETAILS TO BE SEEN IN THE AERIAL PHOTO

The resolution of the aerial photograph enables the following features to be seen with clarity just enlarge.

Bottom Left near Shorey

A: Mill and Flotation Plant
B: Ore/Rock Processing Facility
C: Almirvilca Tunnel outlet

West of Quiruvilca

D: 3800 Level Adit

North and East of Quiruvilca

Approximate position of shafts current/past

ES: Elvira shaft
GS: Graciela shaft
AS: Almiranta shaft
AT: Almiranta adit
PA: Papelillo adit


The RED BOUNDARY LINE defines the approximate area of the Northern Mining Zone.

The YELLOW BOUNDARY LINE defines the approximate area of the Southern Mining Zone.


Information based on past Shareholder and Technical Reports provided over the years by ARSACO and PAS.
 Viewed:  2611 Time(s)

04 - QUIRUVILCA MINE AND DISTRICT.jpg



05 - MAJOR ORE ZONES.jpg
 Mineral: -
 Locality:
Quiruvilca Mine (La Libertad Mine), Quiruvilca District, Santiago de Chuco Province, La Libertad Department, Peru
 Description:
A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF MINERALIZED ZONING AT THE QUIRUVILCA MINE

SIZE OF THE DEPOSIT

Mine extends over an area that is four kilometres east/west by three kilometres north/south and from an elevation of 4,050 m at the top of the mountain down to the 400 level at an elevation of 3,468 m. Access to the mine is from four adits driven into the side of the mountain at elevations ranging from 3,648 m to 3,870 m. The mine is sub-divided into two areas - the North Zone and the South Zone.

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DEPOSIT

The Quiruvilca deposit is polymetallic comprising the following main minerals:

Copper minerals: Tetrahedrite and Chalcopyrite
Silver minerals: Argentiferous Tetrahedrite, Freibergite
Lead mineral: Galena
Zinc minerals: Sphalerite
Gangue minerals: Pyrite, Rhodocrosite, Quartz

The Quiruvilca mine exhibits four distinct and broadly concentric zones of mineralization.

1. ENARGITE ZONE. A Mesothermal zone consisting of Enargite with Pyrite. Other minerals in the zone include Chalcopyrite, Tennantite, Tetrahedrite, Sphalerite, Galena and Hutchinsonite. The dominant gangue mineral is Baryte

2. TRANSITION ZONE. A Mesothermal to epithermal Ore Bearing zone up to 1400 m wide comprising Sphalerite, Pyrite, Tetrahedrite-Tennantite with subordinate Galena, Marcasite, Arsenopyrite, Covellite and Wurtzite.

3. LEAD-ZINC ZONE. An epithermal zone comprising Sphalerite and Galena with subordinate Pyrite, Chalcopyrite, Tetrahedrite-Tennantite, Marcasite, Arsenopyrite, Gratonite, and Wurtzite.

4. STIBNITE ZONE. An irregular shaped epithermal zone containing Stibnite and Arsenopyrite with subordinate Pyrite, Sphalerite, Galena and minor Native Arsenic. The dominant gangue minerals are Rhodochrosite and Quartz.

All zones exhibit the same overall paragenesis in the formation of the minerals. Pyrite deposition followed by the deposition of base metal sulphides, followed by the deposition of sulphosalts and then the deposition of carbonates and/or silicates.

MAIN VEIN STRUCTURE AND MINERALOGY

Veins are typically coarse grained and massive, but in some cases, they are vuggy. When openings do occur in the veins they often host many beautiful collector quality mineral specimens. In many places, there is a well-developed banding in the vein caused by aggregates of sulphides and gangue.

The width of the main mineralized veins vary from about 0.3 m to 2.5 m and have been given some very quaint names (vein width in parentheses) - Compania Centro (0.2-1.5m), Luz Angelica (0.6m), Eva (0.2-1.5m), Betsy (0.2-1.5m), Dina (0.2-1.5m), Elisa (0.2-1.5m), Claudia (0.7m) and Zoila Gata (0.8m).

MINERALOGY OF THE MAIN VEINS

SOUTHERN ZONE

Compania Centro - Sphalerite (40%), Tetrahedrite (20%), Galena (20%), Pyrite (10%), Carbonates (10%).

Eva - Sphalerite (25%), Tetrahedrite (15%), Galena (20%), Pyrite (30%), Carbonates and Quartz (10%).

Betsy - Sphalerite (30%), Tetrahedrite (10%), Galena (10%), Enargite (10%), Pyrite (15%), Quartz (15%), Carbonates (10%).
Luz Angelica - Sphalerite (25%), Tetrahedrite (10%), Galena (20%), Pyrite (20%), Calcium and Magnesium Carbonates (10%), and Quartz (15%).

Zoila Gata - Sphalerite (40%), Tetrahedrite (10%), Galena (10%) Pyrite (20%) and Others (Quartz/Rhodocrosite/Calcite/Dolomite) (20%)

NORTHERN ZONE

Dina - Sphalerite (30%), Tetrahedrite (10%), Galena (10%) Pyrite (25%), Quartz (10%), Dolomite (10%) and Rhodocrosite (10%)

Elisa - Tetrahedrite (15%), Chalcopyrite (10%), Enargite (10%) Pyrite (50%) and Quartz (15%).

Claudia - Tetrahedrite (20%), Enargite (10%) Pyrite (65%) and Quartz (5%)


Information based on past Shareholder and Technical Reports provided over the years by ARSACO and PAS.
 Viewed:  2606 Time(s)

05 - MAJOR ORE ZONES.jpg


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silvia




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PostPosted: Sep 12, 2022 13:41    Post subject: TIN - Silvia's Collection  

Huge Plate of Cassiterite crystals typical of Huanuni Bolivia, weighs 3 Kilograms, excellent condition given the locality. Twinned-black crystals to 17 mm in size. Minor Pyrite present.


01 - CASSITERITE - HUANUNI - BOLIVIA DISPLAY VIEW 2.jpg
 Mineral: Cassiterite
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Dimensions: 150 mm x 110 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Display view
 Viewed:  2353 Time(s)

01 - CASSITERITE - HUANUNI - BOLIVIA DISPLAY VIEW 2.jpg



02 - CASSITERITE - HUANUNI - BOLIVIA MATRIX VIEW 1.jpg
 Mineral: Cassiterite
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Dimensions: 150 mm x 110 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Matrrix view
 Viewed:  2349 Time(s)

02 - CASSITERITE - HUANUNI - BOLIVIA MATRIX VIEW 1.jpg



03 - CASSITERITE DETAILS 1.jpg
 Mineral: Cassiterite
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Dimensions: 150 mm x 110 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Detail of the crystals 1
 Viewed:  2347 Time(s)

03 - CASSITERITE DETAILS 1.jpg



04 - CASSITERITE DETAILS 2.jpg
 Mineral: Cassiterite
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Dimensions: 150 mm x 110 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Detail of the crystals second view.
 Viewed:  2345 Time(s)

04 - CASSITERITE DETAILS 2.jpg



05 - HUANUNI MINING DISTRICT A.jpg
 Mineral: -
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Description:
The Huanuni Tin Mine is near Llallagua, Bolivia. Mine operations consist of extensive underground workings. There is one known shaft. The workings reach a maximum depth of 700 metre and extend for about 1.2 kilometres. The ore body is tabular containing Cassiterite, Stannite and Sphalerite. The waste rock (gangue) consists mainly of Fluorite, Pyrite and Tourmaline. The host rock in the area is rhyolite and dates from the Pliocene epoch - 5.33 to 2.58 million years ago. Comibol is increasing production by tapping into four new veins Keller, Bandy, Chuallani and Notaf.
 Viewed:  2347 Time(s)

05 - HUANUNI MINING DISTRICT A.jpg



06 - EMPRESA MINERA HUANUNI MINE ENTRANCE.jpg
 Mineral: -
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Description:
Mine entrance - presence of the military is always needed.

Courtesy Comibol
 Viewed:  2350 Time(s)

06 - EMPRESA MINERA HUANUNI MINE ENTRANCE.jpg



07 - SANTA ELENA PROCESSING PLANT.jpg
 Mineral: -
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Description:
The old processing plant recently replaced.

Courtesy Comibol
 Viewed:  2348 Time(s)

07 - SANTA ELENA PROCESSING PLANT.jpg



08 -EMPRESA MINERA HUANUNI - MINE ADIT.jpg
 Mineral: -
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Description:
One of several adits at the mine.

Courtesy Comibol
 Viewed:  2348 Time(s)

08 -EMPRESA MINERA HUANUNI - MINE ADIT.jpg



09 - LUCIANITA PLANT 1.jpg
 Mineral: -
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Description:
The 3,000tpd Lucianita plant was built by the Chinese contractor Vicstar Union Engineering under a US$50 million contract awarded in 2011. Vicstar Union Engineering is a joint venture formed by Shenzhen Vicstar and Shandong Gold Groups Yantai Design and Research Engineering Centre. The new plant will replace the aging Santa Elena plant.

Courtesy Comibol
 Viewed:  2350 Time(s)

09 - LUCIANITA PLANT 1.jpg



10 - LUCIANITA PLANT 2.jpg
 Mineral: -
 Locality:
Huanuni Mine, Huanuni, Dalence Province, Oruro Department, Bolivia
 Description:
Lucianita plant. Cerro Pozokoni in the background.

Courtesy Comibol
 Viewed:  2348 Time(s)

10 - LUCIANITA PLANT 2.jpg


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silvia




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PostPosted: Sep 13, 2022 16:45    Post subject: Philosophy - Minerals are not Art - Silvia's Collection  

Philosophy - Minerals are not Art

I am often been saddened by the association of minerals with art. I often think it is a marketing ploy and little else. Minerals may be beautiful and possess artistic features, but by definition minerals are not art. To say they are art implies the miner is the artist, for in the absence of mining the mineral would be encased in stone for all time. Some minerals are visually beautiful while others are absolutely ugly. Nature is either a great artist or a poor one. The main reason why I am hesitant about altering a mineral by physical or chemical means to enhance its saleability.

Art by definition is the manipulation of materials which transforms the materials into new forms, new shapes or new expressions. Art is also by definition an activity of humans who embed in the art their abilities, talents, imagination, ideas, creativity and aspirations. The products of nature may be called art but it takes an intelligent sentient being intent on responding to a creative passion to create true art. Natural things may inspire an aesthetic feeling in some people, and it may sometimes seem as if a natural thing are works of art but only an intelligent sentient being can produce true art.

If minerals are art, then too are crystals grown in a lab. They may appear to be man-made, but the crystals so forming, are simply responding to the laws of chemistry and physics that control the way in which the atoms arrange themselves in a crystal lattice. The same principles apply to crystals grown in veins or fissures in the earths crust. In a lab setting the real art lies in creating the right conditions that will permit the crystals to grow.
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PostPosted: Sep 19, 2022 14:46    Post subject: Celestine - Silvia's Collection  

A classic vuggy Celestine specimen from the Sakoany deposit of Madagascar. The vug is filled with well over three dozen gemmy, rich ice-blue prisms. It also contains a very nice pocket containing some large prisms, including three (6, 5 and 4 cm tall) with classic textbook terminations. All of the crystals in the interior are pristine, with only trivial peripheral damage a consequence of extracting and opening the geodes for display.


01 - Celestine - MADAGASCAR - AFRICA - DISPLAY VIEW 2.jpg
 Mineral: Celestine
 Locality:
Sakoany deposit, Katsepy Commune, Mitsinjo District, Boeny Region, Mahajanga (Majunga) Province, Madagascar
 Dimensions: 150 mm x 120 mm x 90 mm
 Description:
With careful and judicious trimming this specimen could be turned into a high-end small-cabinet specimen something we might do. However my partner does not like this! He often says that many fine minerals on display (even at Museums) or for sale have been butchered.
 Viewed:  2161 Time(s)

01 - Celestine - MADAGASCAR - AFRICA - DISPLAY VIEW 2.jpg



02 - Celestine - MADAGASCAR - AFRICA - CLOSEUP 1.jpg
 Mineral: Celestine
 Locality:
Sakoany deposit, Katsepy Commune, Mitsinjo District, Boeny Region, Mahajanga (Majunga) Province, Madagascar
 Dimensions: 150 mm x 120 mm x 90 mm
 Description:
Close up of the crystals
 Viewed:  2155 Time(s)

02 - Celestine - MADAGASCAR - AFRICA - CLOSEUP  1.jpg


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PostPosted: Sep 20, 2022 02:31    Post subject: Re: Celestine - Silvia's Collection  

A really wonderful specimen from that famous celestite locality. There are masses of them (at least there were masses of them in the past), but specimens of that undamaged quality and with that deep-blue colour are rather rare. Very beautiful specimen!
silvia wrote:
With careful and judicious trimming this specimen could be turned into a high-end small-cabinet specimen something we might do. However my partner does not like this! He often says that many fine minerals on display (even at Museums) or for sale have been butchered.
I must admit I understand your partner. I think that celestite specimen is really nice already and doesn't need any further trimming. Like your partner, I think that there are several specimens on the market where the prep work went too far. I like your celestite the way it is :-)

Best regards
Tobi
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PostPosted: Sep 20, 2022 17:43    Post subject: Re: Celestine - Silvia's Collection  

Tobi wrote:
A really wonderful specimen from that famous celestite locality. There are masses of them (at least there were masses of them in the past), but specimens of that undamaged quality and with that deep-blue colour are rather rare. Very beautiful specimen!
silvia wrote:
With careful and judicious trimming this specimen could be turned into a high-end small-cabinet specimen something we might do. However my partner does not like this! He often says that many fine minerals on display (even at Museums) or for sale have been butchered.
I must admit I understand your partner. I think that celestite specimen is really nice already and doesn't need any further trimming. Like your partner, I think that there are several specimens on the market where the prep work went too far. I like your celestite the way it is :-)

Best regards
Tobi


Many thanks for your words of encouragement.

We do not collect many sulphates or silicates, and I know some collectors might see this as sacrilege. (smiling !!!!!)

The colour of the specimen is as shown in the pictures. This is not always the case, and we have seen many Celestine specimens in person that look nothing like the photos. It was clear that the photos were saturated to make the specimen look bluer than nature intended.

That is why we always ask for a video before finalizing a purchase. And it is the best advice we can give to new mineral collectors always ask for a video. If they refuse to provide one do not buy the specimen.

We now have collector quality representative examples of the alkaline earth chemical elements Calcium, Barium and Strontium. Radium is contained in some of our Uraninite specimens and Beryllium is within our Aquamarine (Beryl) specimens. Magnesium will always be problematic as far as collector quality minerals are concerned.

Silvia
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silvia




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PostPosted: Sep 26, 2022 13:08    Post subject: Copper Pseudomorphs - Silvia's Collection  

A very aesthetic cabinet specimen of an highly unusual and exceptional pseudomorph in which Copper has replaced the earlier crystals of Cuprite, preserving their form and making for a beautiful specimen at the same time. The piece consists of five stacked Copper octahedra. The individual Copper crystals show a superb degree of symmetry and perfection in form. They consist of hundreds of smaller individual Copper crystals. Some of the Copper crystals still host a very thin layer of Cuprite, and this feature gives those crystals a pleasing red patina.


1- COPPER AFTER CUPRITE.jpg
 Mineral: Copper
 Locality:
Rubtsovskoe Mine, Rubtsovsky District, Altai Krai, Russia
 Dimensions: 90 mm x 40 mm x 35 mm
 Description:
Display view 1
 Viewed:  1790 Time(s)

1- COPPER AFTER CUPRITE.jpg



2 - COPPER AFTER CUPRITE.jpg
 Mineral: Copper
 Locality:
Rubtsovskoe Mine, Rubtsovsky District, Altai Krai, Russia
 Dimensions: 90 mm x 40 mm x 35 mm
 Description:
Display view 2
 Viewed:  1790 Time(s)

2 - COPPER AFTER CUPRITE.jpg



MINE.jpg
 Mineral: -
 Locality:
Rubtsovskoe Mine, Rubtsovsky District, Altai Krai, Russia
 Description:
Aerial view of mine
 Viewed:  1791 Time(s)

MINE.jpg


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silvia




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PostPosted: Oct 03, 2022 12:39    Post subject: The Boldut Mine - Silvia's Collection  

Brilliant balls of Pyrite on sharp and partially gemmy Quartz crystals. The largest Pyrite ball is 50 mm wide.


01 - PYRITE ON QUARTZ - BOLDUT - DISPLAY VIEW.jpg
 Mineral: Pyrite, Quartz
 Locality:
Boldut Mine, Cavnic mining area, Cavnic, Maramures, Romania
 Dimensions: 160 mm x 90 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Display view
 Viewed:  1570 Time(s)

01 - PYRITE ON QUARTZ - BOLDUT - DISPLAY VIEW.jpg



02 - PYRITE ON QUARTZ - BOLDUT - MATRIX VIEW.jpg
 Mineral: Pyrite, Quartz
 Locality:
Boldut Mine, Cavnic mining area, Cavnic, Maramures, Romania
 Dimensions: 160 mm x 90 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Matrix view
 Viewed:  1569 Time(s)

02 - PYRITE ON QUARTZ - BOLDUT - MATRIX VIEW.jpg



BOLDUT DISTRICT A.jpg
 Mineral: _
 Locality:
Boldut Mine, Cavnic mining area, Cavnic, Maramures, Romania
 Description:
Aerial view of the mining district. During the Communist/Socialist era Boldut was used as a labour camp to inter those who did not believe 2 +2 equals 5. There was a great escape from the camp which makes for very interesting reading.
 Viewed:  1567 Time(s)

BOLDUT DISTRICT A.jpg



BOLDUT MINE 1.jpg
 Mineral: _
 Locality:
Boldut Mine, Cavnic mining area, Cavnic, Maramures, Romania
 Description:
Monument to the motto - those who not work do not eat. Courtesy Stecz
 Viewed:  1566 Time(s)

BOLDUT MINE 1.jpg



BOLDUT MINE 2.jpg
 Mineral: -
 Locality:
Boldut Mine, Cavnic mining area, Cavnic, Maramures, Romania
 Description:
The sad remains of a former great mine. Courtesy Stecz
 Viewed:  1569 Time(s)

BOLDUT MINE 2.jpg


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silvia




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PostPosted: Oct 10, 2022 13:37    Post subject: Lollingite - Silvia's Collection  

A cabinet sized specimen of Lollingite with a second generation of minor Arsenopyrite. The specimen also hosts Dolomite, Calcite, Magnetite and Fluorite. The Lollingite displays the unique morphology for the locality forming radiating sheaves in which each sheave is composed of oodles of individual Lollingite crystals in bright, silvery metallic, radial fan-sprays.


01 - Lollingite view 1.jpg
 Mineral: Lollingite, Arsenopyrite, Dolomite, Calcite, Magnetite and Fluorite.
 Locality:
Huanggang Mines, Hexigten Banner (Kshktng Q), Ulanhad (Chifeng), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
 Dimensions: 90 mm x 90 mm x 60 mm
 Description:
Display view 1
 Viewed:  1297 Time(s)

01 - Lollingite view 1.jpg



02 - Lollingite view 2.jpg
 Mineral: Lollingite, Arsenopyrite, Dolomite, Calcite, Magnetite and Fluorite.
 Locality:
Huanggang Mines, Hexigten Banner (Kshktng Q), Ulanhad (Chifeng), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
 Dimensions: 90 mm x 90 mm x 60 mm
 Description:
Display view 2
 Viewed:  1298 Time(s)

02 - Lollingite view 2.jpg



03 - Lollingite view 3.jpg
 Mineral: Lollingite, Arsenopyrite, Dolomite, Calcite, Magnetite and Fluorite.
 Locality:
Huanggang Mines, Hexigten Banner (Kshktng Q), Ulanhad (Chifeng), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
 Dimensions: Dimensions: 90 mm x 90 mm x 60 mm
 Description:
Matrix view
 Viewed:  1297 Time(s)

03 - Lollingite view 3.jpg



04 - Lollingite Close up 1.jpg
 Mineral: Lollingite, Arsenopyrite, Dolomite, Calcite, Magnetite and Fluorite.
 Locality:
Huanggang Mines, Hexigten Banner (Kshktng Q), Ulanhad (Chifeng), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
 Dimensions: 90 mm x 90 mm x 60 mm
 Description:
Detail of the crystals
 Viewed:  1299 Time(s)

04 - Lollingite  Close up 1.jpg



05 - MAIN CHINA & INNER MONGOLIA MAP.jpg
 Mineral: _
 Locality:
Huanggang Mines, Hexigten Banner (Kshktng Q), Ulanhad (Chifeng), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
 Description:
Locality map drawn by my partner.
 Viewed:  1298 Time(s)

05 - MAIN CHINA & INNER MONGOLIA MAP.jpg



06 - MINE.jpg
 Mineral: _
 Locality:
Huanggang Mines, Hexigten Banner (Kshktng Q), Ulanhad (Chifeng), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
 Description:
Recent aerial photo of main source of minerals - Shaft 1
 Viewed:  1302 Time(s)

06 - MINE.jpg


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silvia




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PostPosted: Oct 17, 2022 14:33    Post subject: Native Copper - Silvia's Collection  

A specimen of Native Copper composed of groups of interlocking crystals of Native Copper in the shape of a large Scorpion. Individual crystal groups reach 2 cm, and some may be pseudomorphs of Copper after Cuprite. The Native Copper has a gorgeous bronze-milk chocolate patina, and a slightly waxy, metallic lustre.


01 - COPPER - RUBTSOVSK MINE - VIEW 1.jpg
 Mineral: Copper
 Locality:
Rubtsovskoe Mine, Rubtsovsky District, Altai Krai, Russia
 Dimensions: 120 mm x 70 mm x 30 mm
 Description:
View1
 Viewed:  1105 Time(s)

01 - COPPER - RUBTSOVSK MINE - VIEW 1.jpg



02 - COPPER - RUBTSOVSK MINE - VIEW 2.jpg
 Mineral: Copper
 Locality:
Rubtsovskoe Mine, Rubtsovsky District, Altai Krai, Russia
 Dimensions: 120 mm x 70 mm x 30 mm
 Description:
View 2
 Viewed:  1105 Time(s)

02 - COPPER - RUBTSOVSK MINE - VIEW 2.jpg


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PostPosted: Oct 24, 2022 12:27    Post subject: Baryte - Silvia's Collection  

A very aerial group of very sharp thin tabular Baryte crystals, transparent, bright with an intense reddish-yellow color on a matrix of white crystallized Quartz with groups of very bright cubic Pyrite crystals, and partially coated by small white aggregates of Quartz microcrystals and Pyrite crystals.


01 - BARITE ON QUARTZ - BOU NHASS - MOROCCO - DISPLAY VIEW 1.jpg
 Mineral: Baryte, Quartz, Pyrite
 Locality:
Bou Nahas Mine, Oumjrane mining area, Alnif Commune, Tinghir Province, Dra-Tafilalet Region, Morocco
 Dimensions: 120 mm x 90 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Display view
 Viewed:  884 Time(s)

01 - BARITE ON QUARTZ - BOU NHASS - MOROCCO - DISPLAY VIEW 1.jpg



02 - BARITE ON QUARTZ - BOU NHASS - MOROCCO - MATRIX VIEW 1.jpg
 Mineral: Baryte, Quartz, Pyrite
 Locality:
Bou Nahas Mine, Oumjrane mining area, Alnif Commune, Tinghir Province, Dra-Tafilalet Region, Morocco
 Dimensions: 120 mm x 90 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Matrix view
 Viewed:  881 Time(s)

02 - BARITE ON QUARTZ - BOU NHASS - MOROCCO - MATRIX VIEW 1.jpg


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Michael Shaw
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PostPosted: Oct 24, 2022 14:29    Post subject: Re: Baryte - Silvia's Collection  

silvia wrote:
A very aerial group of very sharp thin tabular Baryte crystals, transparent, bright with an intense reddish-yellow color on a matrix of white crystallized Quartz with groups of very bright cubic Pyrite crystals, and partially coated by small white aggregates of Quartz microcrystals and Pyrite crystals.


This is a very beautiful piece, and a great photo.
Michael
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silvia




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PostPosted: Oct 24, 2022 17:01    Post subject: Re: Baryte - Silvia's Collection  

Michael Shaw wrote:
silvia wrote:
A very aerial group of very sharp thin tabular Baryte crystals, transparent, bright with an intense reddish-yellow color on a matrix of white crystallized Quartz with groups of very bright cubic Pyrite crystals, and partially coated by small white aggregates of Quartz microcrystals and Pyrite crystals.


This is a very beautiful piece, and a great photo.
Michael


Many thanks for the words of encouragement. It took a lot of photos to get just the right one well over 300 photos taken over three months. We have many specimens that just will not behave when they see the camera. They look great to the eye but they look too average when a photo is taken. It is not an easy task as what works well with one specimen does not always work well with another.

As scientific collectors of fine minerals we are in the process of creating a fully illustrated catalogue of our mineral collection that will include details of the mines (with pictures of processing facilities and underground workings) from which they were extracted, high resolution photographs of the minerals (front/rear/sides/close-up) and high resolution videos of each specimen. The catalogue will be a lasting legacy for my children and their descendants long after the specimens have moved far away.
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silvia




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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2022 12:27    Post subject: Skutterudite - Silvia's Collection  

This is an important specimen of unusually large size and visual impact, consisting of highly lustrous metallic-gray, Skutterudite crystals to 5 cm in a huge 3-dimensional cluster. The matrix view of the specimen reveals oscillatory zoning during deposition and there are several other minerals (unidentified) growing within the matrix.


01 - SKUTTERUDITE FRONT.jpg
 Mineral: Skutterudite
 Locality:
Bouismas Mine, Agdz, Bou Azzer mining district, Zagora Province, Dra-Tafilalet Region, Morocco
 Dimensions: 140 mm x 110 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Display view 1
 Viewed:  574 Time(s)

01 - SKUTTERUDITE FRONT.jpg



02 - SKUTTERUDITE REAR.jpg
 Mineral: Skutterudite
 Locality:
Bouismas Mine, Agdz, Bou Azzer mining district, Zagora Province, Dra-Tafilalet Region, Morocco
 Dimensions: 140 mm x 110 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Matrix view
 Viewed:  576 Time(s)

02 - SKUTTERUDITE REAR.jpg



03 - SKUTTERUDITE CLOSE UP 1.jpg
 Mineral: Skutterudite
 Locality:
Bouismas Mine, Agdz, Bou Azzer mining district, Zagora Province, Dra-Tafilalet Region, Morocco
 Dimensions: 140 mm x 110 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Detail of the crystals 1
 Viewed:  573 Time(s)

03 - SKUTTERUDITE CLOSE UP 1.jpg



04 - SKUTTERUDITE CLOSE UP 2.jpg
 Mineral: Skutterudite
 Locality:
Bouismas Mine, Agdz, Bou Azzer mining district, Zagora Province, Dra-Tafilalet Region, Morocco
 Dimensions: 140 mm x 110 mm x 70 mm
 Description:
Detail of the crystals 2
 Viewed:  575 Time(s)

04 - SKUTTERUDITE CLOSE UP 2.jpg


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Carles Millan
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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2022 14:02    Post subject: Re: Baryte - Silvia's Collection  

silvia wrote:
We have many specimens that just will not behave when they see the camera. They look great to the eye but they look too average when a photo is taken. It is not an easy task as what works well with one specimen does not always work well with another.

Silvia, believe me, you are not alone. I know what I'm talking about.
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